mrich2029
mrich2029:

berenzero:

socimages:

How to lie with statistics: The relationship between Florida’s Stand Your Ground law and gun deaths.
At Junk Charts, Kaiser Fung drew my attention to a graph released by Reuters.  It is so deeply misleading that I loathe to expose your eyeballs to it.  So, I offer you the mishmash above.
The original figure is on the left.  It counts the number of gun deaths in Florida.  A line rises, bounces a little, reaches a 2nd highest peak labeled “2005, Florida enacted its ‘Stand Your Ground’ law,” and falls precipitously.
What do you see?
Most people see a huge fall-off in the number of gun deaths after Stand Your Ground was passed.  But that’s not what the graph shows.  A quick look at the vertical axis reveals that the gun deaths are counted from top (0) to bottom (800).  The highest peaks are the fewest gun deaths and the lowest ones are the most.  A rise in the line, in other words, reveals a reduction in gun deaths.  The graph on the right — flipped both horizontally and vertically — is more intuitive to most: a rising line reflects a rise in the number of gun deaths and a dropping a drop.
The proper conclusion, then, is that gun deaths skyrocketed after Stand Your Ground was enacted.
This example is a great reminder that we bring our own assumptions to our reading of any illustration of data.  The original graph may have broken convention, making the intuitive read of the image incorrect, but the data is, presumably, sound.  It’s our responsibility, then, to always do our due diligence in absorbing information.  The alternative is to be duped.
Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions, with Myra Marx Ferree. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

What the f—-, people…


Believe none of what you hear, and only HALF of what you see …

Looking at this with a design eye, I could see how the designer of the chart was going for the “puddle of blood” aesthetic, with more red being more deaths.

That being said, it’s a stupid decision that sacrifices clarity for cleverness, which is one of the worst things a designer can do.

mrich2029:

berenzero:

socimages:

How to lie with statistics: The relationship between Florida’s Stand Your Ground law and gun deaths.

At Junk Charts, Kaiser Fung drew my attention to a graph released by Reuters.  It is so deeply misleading that I loathe to expose your eyeballs to it.  So, I offer you the mishmash above.

The original figure is on the left.  It counts the number of gun deaths in Florida.  A line rises, bounces a little, reaches a 2nd highest peak labeled “2005, Florida enacted its ‘Stand Your Ground’ law,” and falls precipitously.

What do you see?

Most people see a huge fall-off in the number of gun deaths after Stand Your Ground was passed.  But that’s not what the graph shows.  A quick look at the vertical axis reveals that the gun deaths are counted from top (0) to bottom (800).  The highest peaks are the fewest gun deaths and the lowest ones are the most.  A rise in the line, in other words, reveals a reduction in gun deaths.  The graph on the right — flipped both horizontally and vertically — is more intuitive to most: a rising line reflects a rise in the number of gun deaths and a dropping a drop.

The proper conclusion, then, is that gun deaths skyrocketed after Stand Your Ground was enacted.

This example is a great reminder that we bring our own assumptions to our reading of any illustration of data.  The original graph may have broken convention, making the intuitive read of the image incorrect, but the data is, presumably, sound.  It’s our responsibility, then, to always do our due diligence in absorbing information.  The alternative is to be duped.

Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions, with Myra Marx Ferree. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

What the f—-, people…

Believe none of what you hear, and only HALF of what you see …

Looking at this with a design eye, I could see how the designer of the chart was going for the “puddle of blood” aesthetic, with more red being more deaths.

That being said, it’s a stupid decision that sacrifices clarity for cleverness, which is one of the worst things a designer can do.

parislemon

parislemon:

John Gruber, ripping apart this piece by Joe Nocera:

The iPad was “just a big iPhone” when it was unveiled in 2010; today it’s hailed as Apple’s last great new product. My guess is we’ll see the same reaction to whatever Apple releases this year. It takes years for even the most amazing of new products — the iPhone, for example — to prove themselves on the market. It’s a long game.

Even then — come, say, 2017, when Apple is reaping billions in profits from some product first introduced this year — the doomed-without-Jobs crowd could (and I bet will) just argue that the product succeeded only because it had been conceived while Steve Jobs was alive. It’ll never stop.

A fun exercise would be to write Apple critiques years in advance and see just how close they are when the stories hit in the future. I bet they’d be pretty close. It’s like paint-by-numbers for the tech press.

The new Apple [product] shows once and for all that Apple has lost its innovative edge. Consumers will instantly see it is nothing more than a [bigger/smaller] [currently existing product (probably iPhone)], and it lacks support for [bullet point feature found in Samsung product]. Mark your calendars, because [date new product goes on sale] will be the beginning of the decline for Apple.

shortformblog
In short: The NSA is said to have decided that the exploit was better something for it to use as an offensive tool than to affect a defensive posture for the rest [of] tech; its decision meant that in its view, its own intelligence efforts were essentially more important than the security of your information.

NSA Exploited Heartbleed For Years,” TechCrunch (via shortformblog)

I guess it says everything that I’m not surprised at all about this.

latenightdramaqueen

Brittany writes up her thoughts on the recently completed Grok 2014 conference. Particularly:

Kristian Andersen, the VC who gave the first keynote, encouraged us to be open and honest, and I felt like everyone really took that to heart. I shared my big pipe dream with one of the groups, something I don’t tell many people about, and found not judgement, but excitement and encouragement. Warm fuzzies abound.

I’ll have my thoughts written up soon. Meanwhile, we’re both counting the days until next year.